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Archive for November, 2010

When The World Moves Away

by Bodwyn Wook

It is the fifteenth of November, 2010. 
     This is the birthday in Heidenheim, Germany, one hundred-and-nineteen years ago of a German soldier I used to admire as an adolescent and young man.  Today, all German soldiers are off, including those who valiantly but belatedly died while opposing Hitler.  Today such coincidences have resumed their proper non-synchronous insignificance.  Today, too, as I write two grandsons, seven and eight,  are on their way to Colorado with their father.  It is a bright and frosty morning up here in southern Minnesota at the top of the Great Plains and he is going off across them in search of work, in fact he has a job lined up, and I do not and cannot begrudge him that.  We are at the end up here of a very heavy early snowstorm, there have been many power outages and it all seems to me like a pretty cold start to Winter.
     They are going three states away.
     It is as bad as when my best friend in third grade, Mark, was taken away by a family move from south Minneapolis to Omaha, and that was only two states.
     To one who no longer cares to travel, to one who realizes that everywhere is as awful as everywhere else and only in details different, to one who really truly wants all those he loves to stay in one place, too, where he can get at them regularly and easily, this is upsetting and very sad to have happen; it may as well all be three universes away.
     The big difference naturally is (more…)

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by Bodwyn Wook

I have been reading Paul Revere’s Ride, by David Hackett Fischer (1994).  The great thing for me is to perceive the feeling in common to the American colonials of 1775 and at the heart of the matter, also, for to-day’s Tea Party movement:
 
By the time of the battles at Lexington and Concord, those Americans — although they still thought of themselves as English — had been on the ground for going on one hundred-and-fifty years.
 
Now that is as long as many of us hereabouts have had family infesting this old Indian-draped Mankato, MN, area, since the 1862 uprising and before.  Only by a heated and intense stretch of the re-enactor imagination can we even see ourselves as being the same people as those of the 1850s and the American Civil War; this sensation of divorcement, and of dwelling in a kind of eternal televisionized “present”, may be quite unlike the feeling the Americans colonials of the second half of the eighteenth century had for their 1620s forebears: the historical problem is that perhaps we simply can not know about this earlier question of (more…)

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by Naml ibn-Raimund al-Haddad ‘abd al-‘Abru

The reason I am actually free to respect this man, “across the aisle” so to speak, is because of my Sufi studies now somewhat progressed.  It is not because of his policies.  These are foredoomed and hopeless factually and historically because they are, now, wholly out-of-time and out-of-place.  It is, exactly, his hard task to teach Americans this once and for all.  And this work calmly done indeed makes him a man more than worthy of the entire respect of “the handful who matter”.  It is because (in some ways like myself in my outward appearance as an objective, actual, down-to-Earth and above all profoundly serene American conservative) he is — again like myself as a Sufi student — not distracted by the braying of halfwits; the howling curses of the asinine excluded who in fact are rightly so because of their jackass enormous psychological and, more importantly, moral deficits; and, the rest of the objectively “God-damned” surplusage, of a muley, failed and wholly useless generation that alone will be saved by the timely and prayerful intercession of (more…)

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by Wayness Tamm-Clattuc

[Dr Tamm-Clattuc is a 1971 graduate of Augsburg College and jungian analyst who worked for many years in Zurich and is now at home in western Wisconsin; the following is the re-posting, with her kind permission, of a comment posted by her in Bodwyn Wook earlier — BW]

I hope that Emmett is doing this deliberately.  Complaining about all of the name-calling in politics — in a true welter of insults all his own! Otherwise he has gone off the deep end completely, sad to say. 

The great problem of politics is that it mires us in the literalist fallacy; thus the air of constant “crisis” and irreality generally.  Everything becomes equally urgent all of the time.  Everything is a tarbaby and no one can possibly disentangle themselves.  That very well may be the historical end of democracy, of course, in which case one must (more…)

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